Covered Bridges, North Carolina

There aren’t a lot of covered bridges left.  One problem is that the building material, wood, doesn’t hold up well to weather.  The other problem is that they were originally built for wagons and horses, not today’s cars and trucks that weigh thousands of pounds.  For these reasons there are only a couple covered bridges in North Carolina. This beauty was moved from its original location and now sits a few miles from the Alston House, also known as the House on the Horseshoe.

A second bridge, the Bunker Hill bridge, sits a few miles off I-40 in western North Carolina.  It’s a bit hard to find, being tucked in a small wooded park off a secondary road.  It’s a really peaceful place to enjoy a walk in the woods

and the craftsmanship of the wonderful old bridge.

Bunker Hill Covered Bridge

By the way, there’s a reason these bridges are covered.  Uncovered wooden bridges have a life span of only 10 to 15 years.  The roofs protect the bridge from the elements and extend the life of the structure.  Luckily for us, there are still some of these bridges to see.

Three Bridges, NYC, September 2004

I took this photo on a beautiful Autumn day in 2004.  There are three bridges in the photo- the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge, and the Williamsburg Bridge.

Brooklyn Bridge

Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse, NYC, 2004

In September 2004 my wife and I spent a week on Long Island and made a couple visits to New York City.  One one of the visits we took the Circle Line tour, a boat tour around Manhattan.  One of the landmark+s we passed was Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse, a small lighthouse located along the Hudson River and under the George Washington Bridge.

Little Red Lighthouse HDR Detail and Darken

The current lighthouse was built in 1921.  The George Washington Bridge, completed in 1931, passed right over the little 40′ lighthouse.  The bridge’s navigational lights made the little lighthouse obsolete and it was decommissioned in 1948.  The Coast Guard had intended to dismantle the lighthouse and auction off the parts but public outcry saved the little light, largely due to fans of Hildegarde Swift’s children’s book, The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge.

Little Red Lighthouse CFX Early Morning Light

Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 and was designated a New York City Landmark in 1991.  In 2002 the lighthouse was relighted by the city.  The little red lighthouse was operational once again.