Bodie Island Lighthouse

North Carolina’s Bodie Island Lighthouse is one of six lighthouses still in operation in North Carolina.  Built in 1872, it’s one of a dozen brick tower lighthouses in America  and is one of the few lighthouses to still use an original first order Fresnel lens.

The lighthouse underwent restoration between 2009 and 2013.  Under the care of the National Park Service and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the beautiful tower is open to visitors who wish to climb its 214 steps.

This photo was taken on a visit in 1999 with a film camera.

Bodie Island Lighthouse

Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse, NYC, 2004

In September 2004 my wife and I spent a week on Long Island and made a couple visits to New York City.  One one of the visits we took the Circle Line tour, a boat tour around Manhattan.  One of the landmark+s we passed was Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse, a small lighthouse located along the Hudson River and under the George Washington Bridge.

Little Red Lighthouse HDR Detail and Darken

The current lighthouse was built in 1921.  The George Washington Bridge, completed in 1931, passed right over the little 40′ lighthouse.  The bridge’s navigational lights made the little lighthouse obsolete and it was decommissioned in 1948.  The Coast Guard had intended to dismantle the lighthouse and auction off the parts but public outcry saved the little light, largely due to fans of Hildegarde Swift’s children’s book, The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge.

Little Red Lighthouse CFX Early Morning Light

Jeffrey’s Hook Lighthouse was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 and was designated a New York City Landmark in 1991.  In 2002 the lighthouse was relighted by the city.  The little red lighthouse was operational once again.

 

 

Vancouver, May 2016

In May of 2016 we were fortunate to be able to take a trip that we had always wanted to take, an Alaska cruise.  We selected Holland America for the cruise line and opted to extend the cruise with a couple days in Denali.

The cruise departed from Vancouver, British Columbia.  We flew in the night before the cruise began so we could have a little time exploring the city.  We didn’t have a lot of time but we made the most of it.

We’re big into finding good restaurants to enjoy and we’d done a little research in advance.  We had dinner in Chinatown at Bao Bei, a modern Chinese restaurant a block or so from the Dr. Sun Yat Sen Memorial Garden.  We arrived at 10pm and the place was packed.  We sat at the bar, which had the benefit that we could watch the bartenders show their skills with a shaker.  The food was good, the drinks were good and, despite a long and trying day, we enjoyed our time there.

I’m not sure what was going on, but Chinatown and downtown Vancouver were packed that night.  There were lines of limousines cruising the roads and literally thousands of young people dressed to the nines filling the sidewalks.  My guess is that it was prom night, but it gave Vancouver a young and vibrant feel.

The next morning, Sunday, we had a few hours before we had to be at Canada Place to begin our cruise.  We found a great little restaurant in the shadow of the hotel called Scoozis.  We were the first customers through the door that morning and we were greeted by the very friendly owner.  We had one of the best breakfasts we’ve ever had, a deep dish casserole breakfast that was absolutely wonderful.  If you have the opportunity I highly recommend breakfast at Scoozis.

Vancouver is a beautiful town, with a mix of ultramodern, art deco and classical European style architecture.  It also has a lot of green space, including the world famous Stanley Park.  One of the architectural highlights of Vancouver is the art deco Marine Building, a skyscraper opened in 1930.  Although it is now dwarfed by the surrounding more modern towers, it was Vancouver’s tallest building until 1939.

Marine Building CFX Stormy Sky

As I said, there are a lot of green spaces in Vancouver.  This little park was just a couple blocks from our hotel.

Downtown Vancouver HDR Deep 1

Another architectural highlight is the beautiful Canada Place, the place where all cruises start or end.  A fabric roofs resembling sails covers the structure.  It’s quite a sight.

Canada Centre HDR Deep 1

It took a few hours to work our way through the embarkation process and to get settled in our room.  Once we were on board and settled we grabbed a drink and headed for the deck to enjoy the cruise out of Vancouver.  We said goodbye to Canada Place and began our journey.

Canada Place Grad ND Ektachrome 64 HDR Hyperrealistic

The sun came out for a minute as we passed the Point Atkinson Lighthouse, marking the Burrard Inlet.  Once we passed under the Lions Gate Bridge, we were officially in the Inside Passage and on our way.

Point Atkinson Lighthouse

 

 

 

 

Lighthouses

I love to photograph lighthouses.  When we travel, if there is a lighthouse nearby we’ll take a ride to visit the site.  Here are a few we’ve visited over the years.

Bodie Island Lighthouse, Outer Banks, NC

The Hattaras Light is probably the most famous Outer Banks lighthouse but I think the Bodie Island Light is much prettier.  The light was built in 1872 and stands 156 feet tall.  It’s one of the few brick tower lighthouses and has an original first-order Fresnel lens.

Bodie Island LH HDR Efx Deep 1

Crooked River Lighthouse, Carrabelle, Florida

Also known as the Carrabelle Light, this cast iron skeleton lighthouse was built in 1895 to replace the Dog Island Light, which had been destroyed years before in a hurricane.  The light stands 100 feet tall and housed a fourth order Fresnel lens.  The light has been decommissioned and the Fresnel lens has been replaced with an acrylic replica.

Crooked River Lighthouse Ektachrome 100

St. Augustine Light, St. Augustine, Florida

This beautiful brick lighthouse was built in 1874 and stands 165 feet tall.  It contains a first-order Fresnel lens.  In 1980 The women of the Junior Service League of St. Augustine signed a 99-year lease on the house and grounds and began restoration.  Shortly after they began the restoration the League signed a 30 year lease of the actual lighthouse and began restoration.  At the end of the 1980s the League had the original Fresnel lens restored.

St Augustine Lighthouse HDR Efex Deep 2